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UK Team Levitates Small Objects Using Sound

Posted: October 29th, 2015 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science Matters | Tags: | Comments Off on UK Team Levitates Small Objects Using Sound

UK Team Levitates Small Objects Using Sound
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A team of UK scientists have cleverly used sound waves to levitate tiny objects, the breakthrough, published in Nature Communications, could lead to applications as out-there as Star Trek style tractor beams :: Read the full article »»»»


MUST SEE! Catalyst’s Dr Maryanne Demasi Does Chiropractic

Posted: July 17th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science Matters | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on MUST SEE! Catalyst’s Dr Maryanne Demasi Does Chiropractic

Dr Maryanne Demasi Does ChiropracticI’m not a huge television watcher, discerning, one show I must see each week – or I seriously get the grumps is Catalyst. For those not-in-the-know, Catalyst is a superlative Australian science program aired weekly on ABC TV, it’s always current, often a lark and most beautifully produced.

My favourite Catalyst, Dr Demasi, this week looked into a worrying trend that has science based medicine up in arms – chiropractors with ambitions of replacing the family gp – There have been reports that chiropractors are the new refuge for a range of health problems, like asthma, colic, reflux and even autism?

Dr Maryanne Demasi reckons, “…most people go to the chiropractor for back pain, and, despite its surging popularity, its proven benefit is fairly limited. A review of spinal manipulation showed that it could alleviate lower back pain, but it was no more effective than heat therapy, or even a good massage.” :: Read the full article »»»»


Science Fact or Fiction Survey Confuddles Australians

Posted: July 17th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science Matters | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on Science Fact or Fiction Survey Confuddles Australians

Science Fact or Fiction Survey Confuddles AustraliansMore than 40 percent of Australians don’t know how long it takes the Earth to travel around the sun, according to a new survey, which also dug-up that nearly 30 percent of Australians didn’t know if humans lived at the same time as dinosaurs.

The Australian Academy of Science surveyed more than 1,500 people, asking them very basic scientific questions.

The survey is a repeat of a 2010 questionnaire, asking the same basic questions, it seems we’ve slowed our thinking – as a nation – way back in 2010 more than 70 percent knew that the earth took a year to travel around the sun.

The surveys author says it’s a wake-up call, he’s also worried that our knowledge of basic science might devolve even further, blaming popular culture and an insufficient school curriculum. We’re not alone however, the US seems to suffer similar symptoms  :: Read the full article »»»»

 @mcsixtyfive

 


Australian Scientists 3D-Print NEW Organs …US Student 3D-Prints a Gun

Posted: May 12th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science Matters, REBLOG | Tags: , | Comments Off on Australian Scientists 3D-Print NEW Organs …US Student 3D-Prints a Gun

3d Printed EarIt’s proof perhaps that we live in an ironic world, Australian researchers are on the cusp of creating new human organs via 3D-printing. While a US student fires the first bullet from a home-made 3D Printed polymer gun.

On the up-side, Australian scientists say they have found a way to grow human body parts using 3D printing technology. The technology isn’t the only cleverness here, 3D printers are now so portable that they might be installed in hospitals.

The University of Wollongong’s Centre for Electromaterials Science is opening a research unit at Melbourne’s St Vincent’s Hospital where 3D printing will be used to reproduce tissue material.

In the US, the State Department has successfully demanded the removal of the 3D printed gun’s schematics from Defcad, a file-sharing site run by Defense Distributed, the group at the centre of the 3D-printed gun controversy.

However, those worried about the ability to download 3D-printed gun blueprints, fret not: The Pirate Bay is apparently on the case, the 3D Printed guns schematics are available for download :: Read the full article »»»»

 @mcsixtyfive


IBM Makes World Smallest Movie, It’s Atomic!

Posted: May 6th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science Matters, IBM | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on IBM Makes World Smallest Movie, It’s Atomic!

IBMResearchers from tech-behemoth IBM have unveiled – confirmed by Guinness World Records –  the world’s smallest movie, made with atoms. Named A Boy And His Atom, the movie used thousands of precisely placed atoms to create nearly 250 frames of stop-motion action.

The movie depicts a character named Atom who befriends a single atom and goes on a journey that includes dancing, playing catch and bouncing on a trampoline. Set to a playful musical track, the movie represents a unique way to convey science outside the research community.

It takes around 1 million atoms to store a single bit of data on a computer, a bit being the basic unit of information in computing. Recently, IBM Research announced it can store that same bit of information in just 12 atoms.  In order to make the movie atoms were moved with a scanning tunnelling microscope. The microscope weighs two tonnes, operates at minus 268 degrees Celsius and magnifies the atomic surface more than 100 million times :: Read the full article »»»»

@verity_penfold


Japanese Dream Machine Predicts Pictures While We Sleep

Posted: April 8th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science Matters | Tags: , , , , , | Comments Off on Japanese Dream Machine Predicts Pictures While We Sleep

Japanese Dream Machine Predicts Pictures While We Sleep

Grrr… Waking from a dream, instantly forgetting it is one of the slight handicaps we suffer as intelligent beings, surprisingly it doesn’t seem to appear on any of the interwebs Most Annoying lists – unlike No 12 our ability to eat with our mouths close – which also eeks me no end! Japanese scientists have solved the first problem, they’ve invented a machine that predicts images dreamt during sleep.

In science Visual Imagery during sleep – dreams, or at least the pictorial part of dreams – has until now been elusive to any objective analysis. Japanese researchers however have taken a novel new approach to our none waking hours, utilising machine learning models are able to predict the visual content of  our dreams. The new study – Neural Decoding of Visual Imagery During Sleep –  published in the journal Science and the findings could pave the way to prevent nightmares :: Read the full article »»»»


Britain’s Halley VI Antarctic Research Station Opens

Posted: February 7th, 2013 | Author: | Filed under: Cankler Science Matters | Tags: | Comments Off on Britain’s Halley VI Antarctic Research Station Opens

Britains Halley VI Antarctic Research Station Opens;REBLOG! Just over a 100 years after Captain Robert Falcon Scott’s Antarctic expedition came to a tragic end, Britain’s latest and greatest Antarctic Research Station has opened. The facility will become fully operational over the coming weeks.

The new research station replaces the 20-year old Halley V, and is the 6th incarnation to occupy the floating Brunt Ice Shelf. The region has been occupied by British science stations since a Royal Society expedition in 1957.

The $US40 million facility was designed by Hugh Broughton Architects and engineering firm AECOM, and represents a continued commitment from the UK’s scientific community to maintain a cutting-edge facility in the region :: Read the full post at Gizmag »»»»