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NSFW: Phishing With Cam Girls: Italian Gamers Stung by Faux Nudity Offers

Posted: March 21st, 2012 | Author: | Filed under: News From the web | Tags: , , , , , , | Comments Off on NSFW: Phishing With Cam Girls: Italian Gamers Stung by Faux Nudity Offers

NSFWThose clever boffins at Symantec have dug up a slick new phishing scam aimed squarely at over enthusiastic Italian gamers. The scam page – hosted on a popular free web hosting site – was cleverly disguised to look like a popular gaming brand, the brand was – according to the scam page – introducing a new service that would allow its users to connect with ubersexy cam-girls.

Luring gamers with super-cute girl pix and promises of girls ready and willing to perform nude webcam shows for a small credit card fee, even luring some with the offer of free shows doesn’t seem to be a hardship, gamers tend to be lost in another-world..

According to Symantec blogger, Mathew Manyara,  the  – scam – gaming brand had prepared a list of users who were willing to perform nude webcam shows. The phishing site claimed that by entering login credentials one could receive through email the names of the users willing to perform and be able to add them to their contact list.

The phishing site explained that login credentials were required because the brand decided could not disclose the names of performers outside the network to maintain the girls privacy. To gain the users’ confidence, phishers assured gullible gamers that there was no scam involved in their offer and verified each performer did perform nude sex acts in the webcam shows ::::

The cost for each performance was set at 1 or 2 credits or free, depending on the performer. After login credentials are entered, the phishing page displays the message: “Incorrect password”. If users fell victim to the phishing site by entering their login credentials, phishers would have successfully stolen their information for identity theft purposes.

Unfortunately for the gullible Italian gamers, once the required information is inserted and the Send button pressed, the credentials are sent to the scammers, users are then notified that they have inserted an incorrect password.

Symantec has advised internet users to follow best practices to avoid phishing attacks:

  • Do not click on suspicious links in email messages.
  • Avoid providing any personal information when answering an email.
  • Never enter personal information in a pop-up page or screen.
  • When entering personal or financial information, ensure the website is encrypted with an SSL certificate by looking for the padlock, ‘https’, or the green address bar.
  • Frequently update your security software (such as Norton Internet Security 2012) which protects you from online phishing.

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